5.6.06

Timor-Leste: textos importantes

This story is from our news.com.au network Source: AAP
Mothers demonstrate for Dili peace By Rob Taylor in Dili
June 01, 2006 SOME of East Timor's mothers and children have demonstrated for peace outside the Government Palace in central Dili. In baking sun and watched over by Australian soldiers, around 100 people wearing head bands and chanted "We want peace" and "We love Timor". They demanded the country's leaders stop days of politically-motivated gang violence. They vowed to stay there for three days or until there was a breakthrough in talks aimed at ending a power struggle over who was leading the country's security forces. A few kilometres away from the group at a market on the city's western outskirts, troops threw teargas to break up warring groups of east and west Timorese. "The children are sick of it and they need to be free of this fear," protest organiser Filomena Reis said. "They cannot sleep under the dust and rain in the open any longer. "In the day they are so hot and at night now it is very cold." The group unfurled banners in the palace forecourt calling onPresident Xanana Gusmao and rival Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri to stop squabbling and solve the country's problems. "It is their responsibility," said Reis, from East Timor's Peace and Democracy Foundation. "The burning of the houses, the killing of the people, it has to stop," she said. No one was on hand to greet the protesters. Mr Gusmao was several blocks away at police headquarters urging serving officers to holster guns and unite behind him. Aid agencies estimate between 50,000 and 100,000 people have been driven from their homes by East Timor's communal unrest, packing into United Nations emergency camps, into churches, parks and fields near international peacekeeping troops. The World Food Program says 65,000 people are sheltering in camps around the capital, Dili, where at least 21 people have been killed in violence, which first flared after almost 600 disgruntled soldiers quit the army claiming ethnic discrimination.